11 Long Distance Relationship Statistics You NEED To Know About - Romancoholic

11 Long Distance Relationship Statistics You NEED To Know About

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I’ve got 11 long distance relationship statistics that will brighten up your day if you're in an LDR and maybe even change your mind about getting into one.

Long distance relationships are challenging and require constant work to succeed. But, guess what: all relationships are like that, regardless of the distance.

Many people can't even stand the idea of being in a long-distance relationship because they believe that it could never work. But sometimes the facts say otherwise.

1. 14 million people in the US are in a long-distance relationship.

If you're missing your boyfriend right now, you're hardly alone. According to a study, there are 14 million people missing their partners just like you.

And that's just the US. Imagine how many couples on the planet are going through the same thing, have the same struggles and problems like you, and they still persist. So hang in there; you're not alone.

2. 75% of all engaged couples have been in a long-distance relationship at some point.

Can you imagine that? A great majority of all couples who are now engaged, 75% to be exact, has gone through the challenges of a long-distance relationship.

So, if you're going through a crisis and can’t see a future together, this might help you regain your confidence. It doesn't matter that you're apart now, you can still end up happily married one day.

3. 3.75 million married couples have a long-distance relationship.

According to Statistic Brain Institute's long distance relationship statistics, 3.75 million marriages are long distance.

Although this may sound a little intimidating, it shouldn't scare you. It doesn't mean you should expect to end up in a long-distance marriage. It just means that even the married couples make it work. When you know that the relationship is worth the fight, the distance doesn't matter.

4. One-third of LDR couples break up upon reuniting.


According to a study from 2006, one-third of all long-distance couples break up once they're reunited. The study claims it usually happens because of the loss of autonomy, increased conflicts and jealousy as well as poor time management.

Instead of letting this stat discourage you, use it as a warning. You need to learn how to adapt to changes once reunited with your boyfriend and continue working on your relationship.

5. Long-distance relationships meant to fail end after 4.5 months on average.

Statistic Brain Institute also explored the amount of time that people stayed in an LDR before calling it quits. They discovered that 4.5 months was enough for couples to decide if it's going to work or not.

If you're past that point, it's safe to say that your man is a keeper. But if you're not, it doesn't have to mean your relationship is doomed. Just make sure to evaluate the situation and decide if this is really what you want.

6. Some couples are happier in a long-distance relationship.

In a study from 2006, Professor Katherine Maguire discovered many interesting long distance relationship statistics. One of them was that some people in an LDR were not too happy about reuniting with their partner eventually.

An LDR allows you to have a romantic partner without losing your independence, which is why it's ok if you're happy with the distance.

7. Adjusting to the distance is easier for women.

Here's one stat that will make you feel better if you're planning to start a long-distance relationship. A study from 1994 found that women adjust much better to the distance whether it's an LDR or a breakup.

But this also means that being apart will hit your boyfriend much harder, so make sure not to neglect his feelings and be there for him when he needs it.

8. The average amount of time being separated is 14 months.

While some long-distance relationships last for years, in others you just have to endure a few months of separation until you're united with your beloved boyfriend. However, on average, couples in LDRs stay separated for 14 months.

Whether this number is reassuring to you or not, the important thing to remember is that this situation is temporary. Even if you need to check off every day on your calendar, one day you two will be together again.

9. Long-distance couples often have better communication.

Even though we may think that long-distance couples can have troubles communicating and keeping the intimacy alive, a recent study suggests the situation is exactly the opposite. This study found that people in long-distance relationships actually have better communication.

They open up more, resolve conflicts better and build intimacy by frequently saying and writing sweet things to each other. This is definitely one of the best upsides of an LDR.

10. Phone calls last 30 minutes on average.

A study found that people in long-distance relationships call each other every 2.7 days and spend 30 minutes on the phone on average.

With the technology we now have, long-distance relationships have become much easier to handle. You have numerous ways of staying in touch and letting your boyfriend know you're thinking about him. You don't have to call him every day or talk for hours but make sure to nurture the intimacy by communicating often.

11. LDR couples visit each other 1.5 times a month on average.

When it comes to visits, they happen 1.5 times a month on average. But even if you see your boyfriend much less than that, you shouldn't worry.

Some couples simply can't afford to see each other that frequently either because of the lack of time or the lack of money. Just try to see each other as often as your schedules and finances allow you.

There are a ton of things you should remember when you miss your boyfriend. One of the most important ones being that you're not alone in this, which is exactly what these long distance relationship statistics are supposed to show you.

Use these stats as an inspiration and motivation to stay strong, nurture your relationship and prove all the non-believers wrong. 
About the author

Amy Shaw

Professional writer. Marketing aficionado. Digital nomad wannabe. When I'm not writing, I'm probably discovering new places around the city, drinking some good beer with friends or dancing.